Jumpstart: My First Job Experience

Now that my time as Advertising & Promotions Staff at Victoria Department Store has ended, I feel obliged to write about my experience.

I wanted to work at Victoria Department Store as Advertising & Promotions Staff because the chance to be part of growth and change in a low profile company was a challenge that was too tempting to resist (not that I tried to, mind you).

Our team was able to bring some firsts to the company. We guested twice on local TV for back to school sale and father’s day, as well as landed on local newspapers for some feature articles about Victoria’s home furnishing and houseware items. Small things, maybe, but significant anyhow.

I had a good time at Victoria. There I met people with brave and amazing stories. I was acquainted with corporate discipline, hard work, and pakikibagay. Being the first team of Ateneans, we stuck out like sore thumbs.

But we were never the ones who’d back out of pressure. If anything, it fueled our thirst.

Below are some of the events that I partook in. 🙂

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Live guesting at Maayong Buntag Mindanao for Back to School Sale and Love for the Children Back to School Charity Drive.

These are the newspaper clip outs from the articles that we’ve had written. I saw to these personally since I am well acquainted with the writers that we tapped.

 

These are the events that I’ve helped handle during my stay as Advertising & Promotions Staff. For a first job, I believe I’ve handled the challenges well and thrown in some good ideas also.

One challenge was the budget. We learned to be creative and resourceful with everything, mindful even to the kind of paper that we printed on and the number of pages. Noting that, events were also limited.

Another challenge was technology. I was assigned as social media manager, and although the lack of our own internet connection has not hampered my daily updates, it has also put limitations on what I (believed) I could do.

Other challenges are those that you either hear about or experience it yourself, such as dealing with different people with different personalities. All the rest, I’ll leave you to stew on that or find out for yourself 😉

Being a team of three was challenging at times, and I was challenged further when my two teammates resigned, leaving me with supervisory responsibilities for a whole department at just 3 months in the job.

The challenge excited me a lot. Not many are given the chance to lead at just 3 months in the job, but I was.

Eventually, I had to leave, but  I learned a lot in my stay at Victoria. I will always remain appreciative of many people and the experience as a whole.

Having learned the foundations at work, I know that I am ready for bigger things to come. My friends and professors have advised that maybe journalism is the right career path for me, and I’m contemplating a lot about it.

I have a thirst for learning. I want to learn the corporate, PR, advertising, teaching, and leadership.

I have just finished a phase, and I know that I have only just begun. 🙂

In photos: Social media advertising

Working as advertising & promotions staff at Victoria Department Store, I managed social media accounts as well as went behind the lens and took over the photography.

A Student’s Gamble

I wrote this article for Atenews. This photo is a screen grab from Latagawa short film made by my classmates. This film and this article tells the story of a tuition fee girl.

“Mga gwapa na sila. Di gyud nimo mailhan nga ga ingun-ana diay sila (They’re all so beautiful that it’s hard to tell that they actually do that).

This is just one of the many lines that imply that the business that goes behind closed doors and twisted sheets is no kept secret, and so is the business that goes behind paying for a University’s steep tuition fee. Students who engage in this kind of business are called TF (tuition fee) girls or TF boys. They say that this form of “business” has been going on for years. What do these girls and boys get in return? A college degree. For some students, flesh is the price of quality education.

A Tuition Fee Girl’s Confession

Although it’s not uncommon knowledge among Ateneans, the topic is still talked about with hushed voices. AdDU Confessions which is an online confession site for Ateneans became a platform for the TF students’ voices to be heard.

AdDU Confessions burst into popularity in 2013 after featuring inspiring, entertaining, and intimate stories from anonymous confessors. The confessors send in their stories through a google document form. One of the confessors was a girl who claims to have been a TF girl when she was studying in Ateneo de Davao University. She says that she was able to graduate from this “agreement,” and also told the readers that being in her shoes at the time was very difficult.

The confessor narrated how she met the person who supported her tuition fee, in exchange of something else. Below is an excerpt from her said confession:

Isa ko mga taga province na nag skwela sa addu. Dili mi datu, katong nag desisyon akong parents na sa addu ko muskwela ang akong una na napangutana sa ila kay ‘kaya kaha nato ang gasto didto? mahal kaayo ang tuition, boarding house pa, libro, baon’ ug ang tubag sa akong parents kay ‘kaya lagi nato na bsta maka graduate ka ug gwapo na skwelahan’.

(I was one of the students in AdDU who comes from the province. My family is not rich, so when my parents decided that I would study in AdDU, the first thing I asked them was, “Are we going to make it?” We wouldn’t pay for the tuition only, but also the boarding house, books, allowance, and others. But my parents just said, “We will make it. The important thing is you can graduate from a good school.”)

Sa among section dghan jud kaayo ug datu, naa koy mga classmate na halos adlaw adlaw naga change ug bag, naa koy classmate na halos taga bulan naga change ug phone. And naa koy na classmate na datu jud sya, gwapo, tangkad, humot kaayo, medyo bugoy ug ang naa sa utok puros ra kabuang. Seatmate mi.

(I had a lot of classmates who were rich. Some of them changed their bags every day, and another one changed phones every month. I also had a classmate who was really rich. He was tall and handsome, and he smelled really good. He was also kind of a bad boy. In my mind, I thought he didn’t know anything serious. We were seatmates.)

 Ako kay maulaw man ko sa iyaha kay syempre datu ug unsa ra man ko. Sige ko niya ginasturya ug ako dili kaayo ko mutingog sa iya kay hunahuna nako dili man ko angay makig sturya ani sa iyaha. Sige syag ka late unya pag attendance dili sya maka attendance, kadugayan niana sya mangayo syag number sa ako para itext lang dw ko niya kung magpa attendance sya so ako gisulat nako akong number sa papel unya gihatag sa iya ug niana sya na isave nalang pud dw nako iyang number incase dw ganahan ko mutext sa iya.
(I was too shy with him. He was too rich, and I’m just like this. He kept on chatting with me, and I wouldn’t answer too much because I didn’t think it was proper for me. He was always late for class. Eventually, he asked for my number so that whenever he comes in late, he could text me to write his attendance for him instead. I wrote my number on a piece of paper and gave it to him. Later, he asked for my phone so he could save his number there, just in case I’d want to text him.)


Nahuman ang 1st ug 2nd year nako na malinawon. Ug classmate gihapon mi sa akong classmate na datu ug kani na time medyo close nami. Ug kani na panahon naa syay uyab na classmate namo. Ako wla koy gusto sa iya kay bugoy kaayo.
Niabot jud ang time na na delay ug padala akong parents sa prelim exam so nakulbaan ko ug niana akong papa na magpadala lang dw pagka next week pero wla jud gihapon. Sa akong pagka stress nag open ko sa akong classmate na wla nagpadala ug pang exam akong parents ug allowance, niana man kaha na sya pila man imong kailangan?

(I finished my first two years in college with no difficulty, and I was still classmates with the guy. We were closer then. He also had a girlfriend in our class. I never liked him then because he was too much of a bad boy. And then one time, my parents weren’t able to send money in time for my prelim exam. I was so worried. I opened up about this to my classmate. What he said shocked me. He asked, “How much do you need?”

Ako kay gusto lagi maka exam ug wla najud koy kwarta so niana ko sa iya pang exam lang ug allowance nako bayaran ra nako kung magpadala akong parents. Niana mana sya lahi dw ang bayad. Ana sya ihatag dw niya unya 6pm kay mag withdraw sa dw sya ug agian ko niya. Naa nakoy hinala kung unsa man jud iyang gusto. Naghulat ko ug 6pm sa roxas gate ug nisakay ko sa iyang sakyanan.

(I really wanted to take my exam, but I had no money. I told him that I needed enough to take my exam and for my allowance, and that I’ll pay him as soon as my parents sent me money. But he told me that he was going to take a different kind of payment. He told me that he’d give me the money by 6pm after withdrawing money from the bank. I already had a clue of what he wanted. I waited at the Roxas gate and got in his car when he arrived.)

Niana sya sa ako ‘kagets naman ka noh kung unsa akong gusto’ so ako murag kapit na sa patalim. Sa akong pagka desperada niuban jud ko sa iyaha.

(“You already understand what I want, right?” He asked me. Because of sheer desperation, I agreed to go with him.)

Although the terms TF girl or TF boy generates reactions of disappointment, or sometimes pity, the confession which was put up on Facebook generated feedback of compassion. These reactions show that Ateneans are more accepting and understanding of the predicament of these students, rather than shaming.

But the twist in the confessor’s story was that it had a happy ending. She says she is now happily married to the person and advised the students who are experiencing the same difficulty in school to trust God instead.

“Para sa mga naga struggle sa ilang pang tuition diha, dili ko mag advise na sundugon ninyo akong nabuhat pero si God maghimo jud ug way para ana. And sa mga hopeless romantic, time will come muabot lang si mr/ms right ninyo. dli lang mag dali. Apili jud ug pag-ampo ang tanan.”

The Gamble

The struggle for a good and sustainable future is no surprise among Filipinos, especially when the price of living is very high. Subsequently, the cost of education is also higher.

Based on 2008 data from the Commission on Higher Education (CHEd), out of 100 Grade One pupils, only 66 finish Grade Six. Only 58 of the 66 go on to enroll in first-year high school and only 43 finish high school. Of the 43 who finished high school, only 23 enroll in college and only 14 of the 23 graduate from college.

Tuition and other school fees in the Philippines also increase annually. In 2009, data from CHED says that the national average tuition rate has increased by as much as 89.93 percent, from P230.79 ($4.526 at the average 2001 exchange rate of $1=P50.99) in school year 2001-2002 to P437.10 ($9.829 at the 2008 average exchange rate of $1=P44.47) last school year. The Metro Manila average rate, on the other hand, went up by 94.54 percent, from P439.59 ($8.62) to P855.20 ($19.23) in the same period.

For the school year 2015-2016, CHED approved the TOFI (Tuition and Other Fees Increase) for 313 private colleges and universities.

Simultaneously, the unemployment rate of college graduates is also high. From the data gathered by the PSA (Philippine Statistics Authority), it was found that the unemployment rate in July 2015 was estimated at 93.5 percent, where 22.2 percent of the unemployed were college graduates.

With a dream in mind, Filipinos fight their daily struggles to pursue that dream, even if it means paying a high price for it. The fight begins with education.

Taxi driver James (not his real name) says that he had a “suki” passenger before. He said that the girl was a student from Ateneo de Davao University. “She was beautiful,” described James. James said that a mutual agreement formed between him and the girl. He would pick her up from school after class and drop her by her dorm where she would hurriedly dress herself up.

“I would wait for her to finish changing her attire and then I would drop her at a hotel. I would still pick her up afterwards and drop her by her dorm so she can change back to her uniform again and then go back to school,” narrated James.

But TF girls are everywhere, said James. “Kami sa mga drayber, gina storyahan man namo na kay musakay man gyud ug taxi nang mga bayhana. Lahi-lahing skwelahan, naa gyud, (We talk about it [TF girls] amongst us taxi drivers because these girls would always ride a taxi. They’re not just in AdDU, but in other schools as well),said James.

While for some, selling the flesh means an investment for the future, this trade is also for basic survival, and a mother’s sacrifice. Atenews was able to interview a sexual worker in Davao City. Requesting for anonymity, “GM” described what life was like in the trade of flesh.

GM had a dream. “Gusto unta nako maging sales lady karun pero mas gusto jud nako makahuman ug skwela kay pangarap man nako na mahimong abogado (I wanted to be a sales lady, but what I really want is for me to finish school because I dream of becoming a lawyer)”, said GM.

GM acknowledges poverty as the main reason that pushed her into this line of work. GM comes home every morning after her duty to 6 mouths that were waiting to be fed. Her duty as a sexual worker comprised of standing by the street at night, outside a bank, waiting for a customer to come.

“All I want is for my children to graduate from a good school,” said GM.

“I’m doing this because I don’t want them to end up like me,” she added.

National Situation on Sexual Trafficking

Philippines is one of the countries in Asia that have the worst situation in terms of sexual trafficking. In the recent years, not more than 800,000 women were reported to have been victims of sexual trafficking, of which 50% were reported to have been minors. 500,000 were reported to have entered prostitution, according to the Philippines Sex Workers Collective.

According to Julius Bungcaras, head of the International Justice Mission (IJM) Cebu’s Community Mobilization for Churches and Students, 10-15 percent of every 1,000 students (10 out of 100) resort to prostitution (Ursal, 2011). As prices grow day by day, a number of people who engage in such employment also increase.
A member of the “Women Hookers Organizing for their Rights and Empowerment” (WHORE) said that Baguio City has the worst case of prostitution, which they recorded to have around 3,000 sexual workers. Baguio City is one of the country’s top tourist destinations.

According to another group, Lawig Bubai, which aims to provide education and livelihood for prostituted women, said that there are around 900 women who are working as Guests Relations Officers (GROs) in bars.

Some of these women came to Davao in search of a job, but wound up in the sex trade instead, according to Lawig Bubai Spokesperson Lory Paburag.

“Poverty, lack of education, and unemployment are the main reasons why individuals engage in prostitution,” said Jeanette Ampog from Talikala, which is a non-governmental organization run by women who offer support, advice and counseling to women who have been forced into the sex trade in Davao.

“These women are forced in the trade just so they can meet their daily needs,” Ampog added.

Ampog added that sufficient support and alternative livelihood should be provided for the “survivors” of prostitution, and that these should fit their skills and capacity, in order for them to provide the needs of their families.

Ampog also said that many of these women initially did not know what they were getting in to, but instead were lured into the trade.

Maria, not her real name, is a survivor of the trade. She claims that she was deceived into the job by a roommate who was a sex worker herself. “I asked her where she works and earns money from because I was very hard up at the time. She told me that she works at a massage parlor and that she would help me get a job there because they were hiring,” Maria narrated.

“When I got there, I was given a bottle of alcohol, a basin filled with warm water, and a towel. When I entered the room of the first customer, I saw that he was naked. I screamed and ran to leave the place,” said Maria.

Dili man nako gusto. Pero kinahanglan man gyud nako ug kwarta. Hantod sa nasanay nalang ko, ug nahimo kong prostitute sa usa ka tuig ra pud, kay gusto jud nako maluwas. (I didn’t want to (work like that), but I really needed the money. Over time, I got used to it, and I worked as a prostitute for about a year only, because I really wanted to leave that job).

For the self-claimed tuition fee girl who confessed in AdDU confessions, they cannot be blamed for entering in that kind of job because of the need for money. “My goal was to graduate, so I just told myself that this is for my future. I held on to the last resort that I had. You really can’t blame me for entering into that kind of job,” she said.

Ateneans’ Stance on the Issue

The issue of tuition fee girls and boys is no kept secret among Ateneans, but many try to be understanding and compassionate.

For 4th Year Mass Communication Student Jerrick Luy, there is no need for judgment, but instead, understanding, of the individuals who have this kind of job. “I think we should understand them because it’s just work and they are doing it so they can continue studying. We shouldn’t judge them because they’re only doing what they can to support themselves,” said Luy. “Who knows, really, they might not be receiving any support at all from their family,” Luy added.

When asked about what he thinks the school should do, Luy said that the school can’t do much to eradicate the trade because for him, it’s a personal decision made by the individuals. “What the school can do is respect them, welcome them, and not criticize them. Even if they are called TF girls, that’s for their future,” said Luy.

The SAMAHAN Central Board is always ready to provide assitance, said SAMAHAN External Vice President and CCO (Campus Clubs Organization) chairperson Kahlil Alcomendras. “Don’t be afraid to ask for help because something can be done, if you go through proper channels. Don’t be afraid to ask SAMAHAN to help you, the admin of the university, or even your friends,” said Alcomendras.

Approach the people whom you think will be able to help you, and you have to trust that they can. You need to be brave enough to ask for help when you need it,” she added.

Severino, Beleno Urge Social Media and Youth’s Role in Changing Politics

February 13, veteran journalist Howie Severino came to Ateneo de Davao University to speak about social media and citizen journalism in the Makinig, Makialam, Makiisa: a forum on the role of social media in the 2016 elections

In this photo, Atenews writers (I included) pose with Howie Severino.

This article was published at Atenews

Award-winning journalist Howie Severino was at Ateneo de Davao University on Saturday, February 13 for the “Makinig. Maki-alam. Makiisa: The Role of Social Media in the 2016 Elections” which is a forum on social media responsibility in politics and citizen journalism, organized by SINIKOM (Samahan ng mga Mag-aaral ng Sining at Komunikasyon).

The event was attended by communication students from Ateneo de Davao University, Jose Maria College, University of the Southeastern Philippines, and University of Mindanao.

The forum was organized in partnership with UCEAC (University Council of something), Blue Vote 2016, Ateneo Task Force 2016, and the Mass Communication Department of Ateneo de Davao University.

UCEAC Director Romeo Cabarde in his opening remarks said that social media can either be a blessing or a curse, and in order to maximize its potential, it should be used to campaign for good governance.

“Good governance begins with vigilant citizenry,” said Cabarde.

Howie Severino has been a journalist for print, television, and online, for more than twenty years now. After five years of heading GMA News Digital Operations, Severino now serves as GMA network’s Vice President for Professional Development.

In his lecture titled, “Cyberspace: A Revolutionary, Perplexing, and Dangerous World”, Severino cites that Philippines ironically tops surveys on internet usage despite it having one of the slowest internet connection speed in the world, and also one of the most expensive.

The implications of this, said Severino, is that social media can have a great impact on Philippines’ political sphere because of the time spent by Filipinos online. This has also paved way for citizen journalism, said Severino, referring to news that ordinary, non-media citizens post on Facebook and Twitter.

For Severino, social media has the power to change the political sphere of the Philippines. He tells the students, “You have all the power and that power is in your hands.”

“A digital device coupled with social media and political freedom creates the most empowered generation in Philippine History,” said Severino.

Social media should be used to criticize, he added. “It is our right, written in our constitution, to criticize our government and our politicians,” he explained.

Ateneo professor and political analyst Ramon Beleno III also gave a lecture in the said event. His presentation titled, “Paano ba Bumoboto si Juan?” tackled on Filipinos’ voting behaviors. According to Beleno, these behaviors such as territorial, personality, patronage, and bandwagoning, indicate the predictability of the outcome of Philippine Elections.

“Philippine elections is very predictable, even the time that weddings of politicians will be held can be predicted,” said Beleno, referring to the weddings of Chiz Escudero with actress Heart Evangelista and Mar Roxas with news anchor Korina Sanchez.

Filipinos also tend to lean towards celebrities, said Beleno, referring to the celebrities who have endorsed politicians both in the past and in the current election season.

Further, Filipinos’ territorial voting behavior, according to Beleno, leads to the formation of political dynasties when local leaders dominate the political sphere.

It can be noted that political dynasties in the Philippines is heavy. The Binays, Aquinos, Dutertes, Ampatuans, are some examples.

The speakers Severino and Beleno reiterated the role of the youth in Philippine politics at the end of the event.

There are many things that we should look out for in social media, says Severino, even hashtags. “Hashtags are meant to trend and change public opinion,” he said.

Mobile data and free Facebook plans can also work to our disadvantage, said Severino.

“When we are on free data and we scroll down news articles that are being shared on Facebook or Twitter, we cannot open it. We just see the headlines which can be manipulated,” he said.

Severino also urged the students to practice verification in reading news articles.

“Always try to verify what you see and read because it [headlines] can possibly have been manipulated”, said Severino.

For Beleno, the youth are the game-changers of Philippine elections.

“If you notice, politicians are targeting the youth kasi kayo yung pinakamarami,” said Beleno to the students.

For the audience, the forum proved to be a timely and knowledgeable event.

“Social media is more than just for selfies, but it’s an avenue for us to spread awareness to our peers, most especially on political issues on election season,” said communication student Frazn Sta. Teresa.

“Let us not limit ourselves to posting, liking, and sharing because being knowledgeable only is not enough. Be engaged. Set a good example for the youth,” she added.

 

Second Chances

I can recount two experiences that I gave extemporaneous speaking a try. The first was during an English festival (or something related) in my senior year in high school, and the second was in my last semester in college at an event attended by communication majors from Davao City.

On both times, I was apprehensive when I was asked to compete.

In high school, I remember I was persuaded by my English professor to give this competition a try, saying she saw potential in how I wrote my answers in an exam that she gave. I was pressured, honored, scared, and angry all at the same time. I remember saying Yes to my teacher even though I knew I wasn’t ready.

True enough, on stage I wasn’t able to say anything. My voice was stuck in my throat and my mind couldn’t think beyond the eyes of the audience in a gymnasium filled with all students and teachers of my school.

I stared at the audience, said “Thank you,” and left the stage.

I have never been the kind of person to make vows and promises after a devastating experience, because I usually just let these things flow. But that day, I walked alone to the jeepney stop with my head hung low and I vowed to never join speaking competitions again, ever. The shame that I felt was nothing like I have ever felt before.

Fast-forward to four years later and I’m a few months shy from finishing my degree in mass communication. It was late, it was 9 or maybe 10 in the evening. If I remember correctly, I was about to sleep and I was surprised that my phone rang. My classmate was calling. Calls are commonly made in the day time, unless it’s urgent. Apparently, CMAD (Communication Majors Alliance of Davao) is having their Commvergence the next day, which is an interschool competition on many fields. The event was happening the next day, it was going to be held at our school, and Ateneo itself had no one to represent them for the extemporaneous dialogue.

It was Carly who called me, a classmate of mine. She was one of the major organizers of the event and she was asking if I could partner with Kate, another classmate, to compete in extemporaneous dialogue. Everyone else was too busy to participate. I remember Carly had me when she said “Ikaw nalang gyud among pag-asa bai.” (You’re out last hope). I know how hard my classmates work for all events and I know they would be broken-hearted if no one would be able to represent for the school. And I don’t know if it was Carly’s persuasion or some internal force from within who wants to do it, but I said yes.

Backstage I was openly speaking to our competitors about my fear and nervousness (which isn’t advisable by the way, it’s as if you’re belittling yourself) but I was just genuinely honest. Kate and I were the last pair to go out on stage. We were given a minute to understand our topic and 3 minutes to have a dialogue.

Afterwards, I lamented about how bad I thought I did. Our classmates were all cheering us up, saying we were sure to win. I said in my mind, well, they are our classmates. Of course they’d support us.

During the awarding ceremony, names were called one after the other. 3rd place, 2nd place, and still we haven’t heard our names. I squeezed Kate’s hand very hard.

I remember telling myself that it’s okay, I tried my best and conquered my fear and that’s all that matters.

To cut the story short, we bagged the crown.

I remember shooting off my seat like a rocket being launched into space when I heard our names called as champions. It was a teamwork and I couldn’t have done it without Kate, but I know in my heart that, finally, I’ve proven to myself that I can do it. I conquered my fear.