Freelance: Scriptwriting for Department of Agriculture Region XI Programs

I have to admit–prior to working on projects with local government units in Davao, my perspective of any kind of government was very far from what it really is. I’m really thankful to have gotten to work with government units in the past, for the experience was an eye opener for my youthful idealism.

The first government unit I worked with was the Department of Trade and Industry, where I contributed to their Asenso Ka! magazine. The Department of Agriculture is the second.

I spent most of October and November 2016 working with the Department of Agriculture. I was scriptwriting for a video production that Visual Insights Multimedia (VIMP) won the bidding for the Department of Agriculture.

I met the studio’s owner, Sir Kenny O’Bajo, maybe around February 2016. My singer-actress friend Jizella Dea Formilleza brought me with her as she auditioned a piece for a video commercial that VIMP was making for Davao Light.  We talked about some stuff and he seemed interested when I mentioned that I’m a writer. He gave me his email and asked to see some of my previous works.

Fresh out of college at April, Sir Kenny contacted me and offered two jobs: this project, and if maybe I’d like to be trained in VIMP. I took the project, but decided to go corporate. Here’s a recap of my first job experience. 🙂

Although I’ve sort of freelanced when I was still in college, I still consider this as my first, partly  because it’s the first time that I was able to dedicate all my time to without worrying about school.

Christmas and new year is getting closer as I write, so I know for sure that this project was one of the best, most memorable and enjoyable experiences that I had this 2016. Or maybe I should get out more often? 😀

Anyway, this project is a series of success and tech/instructional videos featuring  Department of Agriculture XI programs.

I wasn’t able to take photos in all our shoots, but I definitely had fun in all of them! I love traveling. Seeing Mindanao’s rural spots is amazing.

This was during our first meeting, a story conference.

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Grabbed from Sir Kenny’s Instagram Account

This was mostly planning, though. The storyline for the topics were simple enough to understand and execute.

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The Production Team. Chico Pace (Videographer), Eloisa Aninon (Coordinator), Kent Marcos & Corinth Mabalot (PA). 

Gulayan sa Paaralan Program
Bala, Magsaysay

Never underestimate the power of small-scale agriculture. In a move to curb the growing malnutrition rate in the country, the Department of Agriculture, in partnership with the Department of Education, implemented the Gulayan sa Paaralan Program in all public schools nationwide. This program seeks to support vegetable gardens in schools, the produce of which will be used to feed the school children.

*The Department of Agriculture wanted to feature the schools with best gulayan sa paaralan program in Mindanao.

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Path to the vegetable patch. Tanglad (lemongrass) and marigold are planted everywhere to stave off the mosquitoes. During dengue season where cases in Davao would rise to more than 4,000, in Bala, there was none. 
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A dedicated educator. I had to have a photo with her after the interview. A teacher’s heart is so admirable! 
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They were the kindest, sweetest group of kids I’d seen in a long time. They’d line up to hold your hand and press it against their foreheads. In the Philippines, it’s a sign of respect for elders. This is usually given to parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles, and godparents.

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Bala, Magsaysay Elementary School is one of the most charming places I’ve been to. The school teachers had gotten the whole community to pitch help in cultivating the mini farm that the school had because of its wide area. Everything they grew was organic. They basically had everything–even a fish pond!

Some of the produce are sold, and the money is meant to buy school materials. Most of the produce, however, are used to feed children for a twice-daily feeding program. Because Bala is situated in a very rural community, there are students who, the teachers told me, would go to school in the mornings and go home at 12 noon because they didn’t have any food to eat.

There were zero absences and tardiness after they implemented the feeding program, they added.

Gulayan sa Paaralan Program
Compostela Valley

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Very shy interviewee

 

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All About Bananas: Fusarium Wilt Control Measures
Compostela Valley

In 2012, following the surge of Typhoon Pablo, a deadly plant disease called Fusarium Wilt, also known as Panama disease, spread across banana plantations in Mindanao–causing many to shut down operations.

Research and funds were released to mitigate the disease. Already, the disease has caused severe, almost irreparable damage on banana growers and banana imports.

Some growers opted to shift crops to cacao, and others decided to avail of the new variety of bananas called GCTCV218 and 219. GCTCV stands for Giant Cavendish Tissue Culture Variant, which is immune to the panama disease.

Although growers are vocal about their preference of the old variety compared to the new one, they are also greatly appreciative of the GCTCV218 and 219. Otherwise, the losses would have compelled them to throw in the towel and walk away from banana growing.

Philippines is one of the top growers of banana in Asia.

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An emotional interview.
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We followed the harvesting and packaging process at a processing facility. 

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Rehoboth Cacao Farmers Association
Davao del Norte

We interviewed a small association, the Rehoboth Cacao Farmers Association, who had found hope in the cacao that they grew.

Formerly a religious group, it is now an association of dedicated cacao growers. Rehoboth translates to “Well of Blessings.”

Cacao is one of the most in demand crops now, as it is the source of coffee and chocolate. The demands of chocolate and cacao are met with a threatening low supply. Philippines is eyed to be one of the top cacao growers in Asia.

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Drying Process

 

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Mixing dark chocolate

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Cacao Rehabilitation
Malita, Davao Occidental

This is a tech process. The Department of Agriculture has a team of researchers and pathologists who reach out to farmers to give trainings on proper production processes, and etc. The cacao tree, although it can grow for more than ten years, has to undergo rehabilitation in order for it to continue producing good yield.

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Challenging shoot! Chico (videographer) had to dodge a few falling branches. Sir Kenny was there to direct though.
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Deconstructing the set.

Dynamic Vegetable Growers Association (DVEGA)
Davao del Norte

The Dynamic Vegetable Growers Association is a group of farmers who have united in order to support each other in producing more yield and working with a more organized system of production and harvest.

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Farmer showing how to spot a good eggplant.
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Ants on a sloping hill
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After climbing a steep mountainside.

Rubber Tapping
Marilog District, Davao City

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Army, ready to shoot.

Subangon Dumang Makers
A story of Filipino resilience

In 2012, Cateel, Davao Oriental was hit the hardest by the Typhoon Pablo. The typhoon destroyed their homes and their crops, their only source of living. For weeks and months after, people described Cateel’s hills as na kalbo, a local term for bald, because the trees and lush greens that adorned the hills were all washed away by the strong storm surge.

But people were quick to find a new means of earning money. Chili grew faster than most crops, so they opted to shift. The Department of Agriculture provided financial and production support.

We interviewed the Subangon Dumang Makers, the top chili processing facility in the town.

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Dried Chili – Just a few moments away from being grinded into powder!
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Laying on a solar dryer
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Locals have termed hot chili into “Hot Pablo” as a memento of resilience. 

BEMWA Farms
Agritourism

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Picnic kind of interview set up. Beautiful! Photo taken by Chico, our videographer. He left the camera rolling on its own for a few moments.
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Coco captured me at my best. This will always be one of my favorite production shoots, mainly because of the climate and the scenery. I love BEMWA’s story too!

BEMWA farm is not a farm that operates on money, it operates on love and equality. I had a great discussion with one of the owners, Mr. Marlo. He sells his vegetables at a very cheap price in order to bring healthy living to middle and lower class households. For him, healthy ain’t just for the wealthy 😄

He also helps his farmers. His farmers, about 60% of which are lumads, or natives, all receive free board and food at the farm. I talked with one of the farmers too, she said that they (owners) also extend financial assistance when they need it.

For Mr. Marlo, he views BEMWA and agriculture as a platform to bring change. One of his advocacies is to educate Filipino farmers about sustainable farming.

BEMWA is a vegetable farm located at Marilog, Calinan District. They sell mainly lettuces. The climate and strawberry picking gained BEMWA popularity. This introduced the concept of #agritourism to the owners since BEMWA is now a tourist attraction.

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With Mr. Marlo Yap, one of the owners. He is the M in the BEMWA. 😀 Businessman, philanthropist, farmer with a heart. 

I tried to wrap all things up here in one blog post because I can’t disclose much details as of now (the project is ongoing).But my love for stories has never died.

Until the next post! 🙂

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Jumpstart: My First Job Experience

Now that my time as Advertising & Promotions Staff at Victoria Department Store has ended, I feel obliged to write about my experience.

I wanted to work at Victoria Department Store as Advertising & Promotions Staff because the chance to be part of growth and change in a low profile company was a challenge that was too tempting to resist (not that I tried to, mind you).

Our team was able to bring some firsts to the company. We guested twice on local TV for back to school sale and father’s day, as well as landed on local newspapers for some feature articles about Victoria’s home furnishing and houseware items. Small things, maybe, but significant anyhow.

I had a good time at Victoria. There I met people with brave and amazing stories. I was acquainted with corporate discipline, hard work, and pakikibagay. Being the first team of Ateneans, we stuck out like sore thumbs.

But we were never the ones who’d back out of pressure. If anything, it fueled our thirst.

Below are some of the events that I partook in. 🙂

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Live guesting at Maayong Buntag Mindanao for Back to School Sale and Love for the Children Back to School Charity Drive.

These are the newspaper clip outs from the articles that we’ve had written. I saw to these personally since I am well acquainted with the writers that we tapped.

 

These are the events that I’ve helped handle during my stay as Advertising & Promotions Staff. For a first job, I believe I’ve handled the challenges well and thrown in some good ideas also.

One challenge was the budget. We learned to be creative and resourceful with everything, mindful even to the kind of paper that we printed on and the number of pages. Noting that, events were also limited.

Another challenge was technology. I was assigned as social media manager, and although the lack of our own internet connection has not hampered my daily updates, it has also put limitations on what I (believed) I could do.

Other challenges are those that you either hear about or experience it yourself, such as dealing with different people with different personalities. All the rest, I’ll leave you to stew on that or find out for yourself 😉

Being a team of three was challenging at times, and I was challenged further when my two teammates resigned, leaving me with supervisory responsibilities for a whole department at just 3 months in the job.

The challenge excited me a lot. Not many are given the chance to lead at just 3 months in the job, but I was.

Eventually, I had to leave, but  I learned a lot in my stay at Victoria. I will always remain appreciative of many people and the experience as a whole.

Having learned the foundations at work, I know that I am ready for bigger things to come. My friends and professors have advised that maybe journalism is the right career path for me, and I’m contemplating a lot about it.

I have a thirst for learning. I want to learn the corporate, PR, advertising, teaching, and leadership.

I have just finished a phase, and I know that I have only just begun. 🙂

In photos: Social media advertising

Working as advertising & promotions staff at Victoria Department Store, I managed social media accounts as well as went behind the lens and took over the photography.

Beginnings and Endings

I walked through the gates of my alma mater, Ateneo de Davao University earlier. Walking past the gazebos, I looked up at the trees and was struck with a startling realization that Ateneo has never felt more like home to me than it does now.

Maybe I will grow to love the building that I will now work in 8 hours a day. Maybe the time will come that I will call it “home” also. But I doubt it.

I have no regrets in my life’s decisions. In time I grew to appreciate the wisdom behind every brick that life throws at me. Because no matter how hard you try to plan and control your life, you can’t. There are things that are beyond your control. And these things are crazy and devastating and amazing and heartbreaking and beautiful… anything goes.

And as I was walking down the familiar path on the way to the Atenews office, I thought a lot about how much I miss feeling the breeze from the trees caress my cheek, or hear the birds sing. I miss the steady hum of activity that you can hear in school.

I will miss the cafeteria and its aircons that are on full blast. I will miss the shakes at Juice Ko Day. I will even miss telling the tindera that I will not buy the viva water because it tastes bad. 😀

I will miss the library and its endless array of books that you can get lost in. I will miss scouting the buildings, looking for the water fountain that had the coldest water. The ones at Wieman were always the best. 😉

I will miss seeing the familiar and comfortable, yet also imposing image of our building when I get down from the jeep. I will miss the clean, fresh air inside. Ateneo was always a welcome respite from the heat and pollution outside.

I will miss the freedom to learn whatever you wanted to learn. The world is literally at the palm of your hands when you are in Ateneo. You only have to choose.

It was in Ateneo’s walls where I had discovered myself and discovered what I had wanted to do with life. It was there where I had met the worst and best people. It was there that I realized that everyone can be nice, but not everyone can be your friends.

It was there that I realized that I am not, after all, as stupid and shallow as what my siblings used to make me feel. I am quite the contrary, in fact.  It took the opinion of other people to change the way I thought about myself.

It was there where I had my heart broken too many times by too many people and yet I never failed to look forward to life.

My experiences are far from conventional. It is something that you might never experience. And it is something that is so rare and fragile and sacred.

There is a kind of beauty in pain. There is grace in handling shame and embarrassment. There is a kind of beauty in you, one so deep that one cannot see on first sight, and something that you cannot see unless you have your heart, your soul, and your whole being broken.

Many will give up on a bird who is trying to fly with broken wings.

But look at where I am now.

Just remember, when you get your heart broken or your soul wounded, fly with a broken wing. Only when you are burned and blinded by the sun will you see your true capacity to heal.

Only then will you be new again. 🙂

A Student’s Gamble

I wrote this article for Atenews. This photo is a screen grab from Latagawa short film made by my classmates. This film and this article tells the story of a tuition fee girl.

“Mga gwapa na sila. Di gyud nimo mailhan nga ga ingun-ana diay sila (They’re all so beautiful that it’s hard to tell that they actually do that).

This is just one of the many lines that imply that the business that goes behind closed doors and twisted sheets is no kept secret, and so is the business that goes behind paying for a University’s steep tuition fee. Students who engage in this kind of business are called TF (tuition fee) girls or TF boys. They say that this form of “business” has been going on for years. What do these girls and boys get in return? A college degree. For some students, flesh is the price of quality education.

A Tuition Fee Girl’s Confession

Although it’s not uncommon knowledge among Ateneans, the topic is still talked about with hushed voices. AdDU Confessions which is an online confession site for Ateneans became a platform for the TF students’ voices to be heard.

AdDU Confessions burst into popularity in 2013 after featuring inspiring, entertaining, and intimate stories from anonymous confessors. The confessors send in their stories through a google document form. One of the confessors was a girl who claims to have been a TF girl when she was studying in Ateneo de Davao University. She says that she was able to graduate from this “agreement,” and also told the readers that being in her shoes at the time was very difficult.

The confessor narrated how she met the person who supported her tuition fee, in exchange of something else. Below is an excerpt from her said confession:

Isa ko mga taga province na nag skwela sa addu. Dili mi datu, katong nag desisyon akong parents na sa addu ko muskwela ang akong una na napangutana sa ila kay ‘kaya kaha nato ang gasto didto? mahal kaayo ang tuition, boarding house pa, libro, baon’ ug ang tubag sa akong parents kay ‘kaya lagi nato na bsta maka graduate ka ug gwapo na skwelahan’.

(I was one of the students in AdDU who comes from the province. My family is not rich, so when my parents decided that I would study in AdDU, the first thing I asked them was, “Are we going to make it?” We wouldn’t pay for the tuition only, but also the boarding house, books, allowance, and others. But my parents just said, “We will make it. The important thing is you can graduate from a good school.”)

Sa among section dghan jud kaayo ug datu, naa koy mga classmate na halos adlaw adlaw naga change ug bag, naa koy classmate na halos taga bulan naga change ug phone. And naa koy na classmate na datu jud sya, gwapo, tangkad, humot kaayo, medyo bugoy ug ang naa sa utok puros ra kabuang. Seatmate mi.

(I had a lot of classmates who were rich. Some of them changed their bags every day, and another one changed phones every month. I also had a classmate who was really rich. He was tall and handsome, and he smelled really good. He was also kind of a bad boy. In my mind, I thought he didn’t know anything serious. We were seatmates.)

 Ako kay maulaw man ko sa iyaha kay syempre datu ug unsa ra man ko. Sige ko niya ginasturya ug ako dili kaayo ko mutingog sa iya kay hunahuna nako dili man ko angay makig sturya ani sa iyaha. Sige syag ka late unya pag attendance dili sya maka attendance, kadugayan niana sya mangayo syag number sa ako para itext lang dw ko niya kung magpa attendance sya so ako gisulat nako akong number sa papel unya gihatag sa iya ug niana sya na isave nalang pud dw nako iyang number incase dw ganahan ko mutext sa iya.
(I was too shy with him. He was too rich, and I’m just like this. He kept on chatting with me, and I wouldn’t answer too much because I didn’t think it was proper for me. He was always late for class. Eventually, he asked for my number so that whenever he comes in late, he could text me to write his attendance for him instead. I wrote my number on a piece of paper and gave it to him. Later, he asked for my phone so he could save his number there, just in case I’d want to text him.)


Nahuman ang 1st ug 2nd year nako na malinawon. Ug classmate gihapon mi sa akong classmate na datu ug kani na time medyo close nami. Ug kani na panahon naa syay uyab na classmate namo. Ako wla koy gusto sa iya kay bugoy kaayo.
Niabot jud ang time na na delay ug padala akong parents sa prelim exam so nakulbaan ko ug niana akong papa na magpadala lang dw pagka next week pero wla jud gihapon. Sa akong pagka stress nag open ko sa akong classmate na wla nagpadala ug pang exam akong parents ug allowance, niana man kaha na sya pila man imong kailangan?

(I finished my first two years in college with no difficulty, and I was still classmates with the guy. We were closer then. He also had a girlfriend in our class. I never liked him then because he was too much of a bad boy. And then one time, my parents weren’t able to send money in time for my prelim exam. I was so worried. I opened up about this to my classmate. What he said shocked me. He asked, “How much do you need?”

Ako kay gusto lagi maka exam ug wla najud koy kwarta so niana ko sa iya pang exam lang ug allowance nako bayaran ra nako kung magpadala akong parents. Niana mana sya lahi dw ang bayad. Ana sya ihatag dw niya unya 6pm kay mag withdraw sa dw sya ug agian ko niya. Naa nakoy hinala kung unsa man jud iyang gusto. Naghulat ko ug 6pm sa roxas gate ug nisakay ko sa iyang sakyanan.

(I really wanted to take my exam, but I had no money. I told him that I needed enough to take my exam and for my allowance, and that I’ll pay him as soon as my parents sent me money. But he told me that he was going to take a different kind of payment. He told me that he’d give me the money by 6pm after withdrawing money from the bank. I already had a clue of what he wanted. I waited at the Roxas gate and got in his car when he arrived.)

Niana sya sa ako ‘kagets naman ka noh kung unsa akong gusto’ so ako murag kapit na sa patalim. Sa akong pagka desperada niuban jud ko sa iyaha.

(“You already understand what I want, right?” He asked me. Because of sheer desperation, I agreed to go with him.)

Although the terms TF girl or TF boy generates reactions of disappointment, or sometimes pity, the confession which was put up on Facebook generated feedback of compassion. These reactions show that Ateneans are more accepting and understanding of the predicament of these students, rather than shaming.

But the twist in the confessor’s story was that it had a happy ending. She says she is now happily married to the person and advised the students who are experiencing the same difficulty in school to trust God instead.

“Para sa mga naga struggle sa ilang pang tuition diha, dili ko mag advise na sundugon ninyo akong nabuhat pero si God maghimo jud ug way para ana. And sa mga hopeless romantic, time will come muabot lang si mr/ms right ninyo. dli lang mag dali. Apili jud ug pag-ampo ang tanan.”

The Gamble

The struggle for a good and sustainable future is no surprise among Filipinos, especially when the price of living is very high. Subsequently, the cost of education is also higher.

Based on 2008 data from the Commission on Higher Education (CHEd), out of 100 Grade One pupils, only 66 finish Grade Six. Only 58 of the 66 go on to enroll in first-year high school and only 43 finish high school. Of the 43 who finished high school, only 23 enroll in college and only 14 of the 23 graduate from college.

Tuition and other school fees in the Philippines also increase annually. In 2009, data from CHED says that the national average tuition rate has increased by as much as 89.93 percent, from P230.79 ($4.526 at the average 2001 exchange rate of $1=P50.99) in school year 2001-2002 to P437.10 ($9.829 at the 2008 average exchange rate of $1=P44.47) last school year. The Metro Manila average rate, on the other hand, went up by 94.54 percent, from P439.59 ($8.62) to P855.20 ($19.23) in the same period.

For the school year 2015-2016, CHED approved the TOFI (Tuition and Other Fees Increase) for 313 private colleges and universities.

Simultaneously, the unemployment rate of college graduates is also high. From the data gathered by the PSA (Philippine Statistics Authority), it was found that the unemployment rate in July 2015 was estimated at 93.5 percent, where 22.2 percent of the unemployed were college graduates.

With a dream in mind, Filipinos fight their daily struggles to pursue that dream, even if it means paying a high price for it. The fight begins with education.

Taxi driver James (not his real name) says that he had a “suki” passenger before. He said that the girl was a student from Ateneo de Davao University. “She was beautiful,” described James. James said that a mutual agreement formed between him and the girl. He would pick her up from school after class and drop her by her dorm where she would hurriedly dress herself up.

“I would wait for her to finish changing her attire and then I would drop her at a hotel. I would still pick her up afterwards and drop her by her dorm so she can change back to her uniform again and then go back to school,” narrated James.

But TF girls are everywhere, said James. “Kami sa mga drayber, gina storyahan man namo na kay musakay man gyud ug taxi nang mga bayhana. Lahi-lahing skwelahan, naa gyud, (We talk about it [TF girls] amongst us taxi drivers because these girls would always ride a taxi. They’re not just in AdDU, but in other schools as well),said James.

While for some, selling the flesh means an investment for the future, this trade is also for basic survival, and a mother’s sacrifice. Atenews was able to interview a sexual worker in Davao City. Requesting for anonymity, “GM” described what life was like in the trade of flesh.

GM had a dream. “Gusto unta nako maging sales lady karun pero mas gusto jud nako makahuman ug skwela kay pangarap man nako na mahimong abogado (I wanted to be a sales lady, but what I really want is for me to finish school because I dream of becoming a lawyer)”, said GM.

GM acknowledges poverty as the main reason that pushed her into this line of work. GM comes home every morning after her duty to 6 mouths that were waiting to be fed. Her duty as a sexual worker comprised of standing by the street at night, outside a bank, waiting for a customer to come.

“All I want is for my children to graduate from a good school,” said GM.

“I’m doing this because I don’t want them to end up like me,” she added.

National Situation on Sexual Trafficking

Philippines is one of the countries in Asia that have the worst situation in terms of sexual trafficking. In the recent years, not more than 800,000 women were reported to have been victims of sexual trafficking, of which 50% were reported to have been minors. 500,000 were reported to have entered prostitution, according to the Philippines Sex Workers Collective.

According to Julius Bungcaras, head of the International Justice Mission (IJM) Cebu’s Community Mobilization for Churches and Students, 10-15 percent of every 1,000 students (10 out of 100) resort to prostitution (Ursal, 2011). As prices grow day by day, a number of people who engage in such employment also increase.
A member of the “Women Hookers Organizing for their Rights and Empowerment” (WHORE) said that Baguio City has the worst case of prostitution, which they recorded to have around 3,000 sexual workers. Baguio City is one of the country’s top tourist destinations.

According to another group, Lawig Bubai, which aims to provide education and livelihood for prostituted women, said that there are around 900 women who are working as Guests Relations Officers (GROs) in bars.

Some of these women came to Davao in search of a job, but wound up in the sex trade instead, according to Lawig Bubai Spokesperson Lory Paburag.

“Poverty, lack of education, and unemployment are the main reasons why individuals engage in prostitution,” said Jeanette Ampog from Talikala, which is a non-governmental organization run by women who offer support, advice and counseling to women who have been forced into the sex trade in Davao.

“These women are forced in the trade just so they can meet their daily needs,” Ampog added.

Ampog added that sufficient support and alternative livelihood should be provided for the “survivors” of prostitution, and that these should fit their skills and capacity, in order for them to provide the needs of their families.

Ampog also said that many of these women initially did not know what they were getting in to, but instead were lured into the trade.

Maria, not her real name, is a survivor of the trade. She claims that she was deceived into the job by a roommate who was a sex worker herself. “I asked her where she works and earns money from because I was very hard up at the time. She told me that she works at a massage parlor and that she would help me get a job there because they were hiring,” Maria narrated.

“When I got there, I was given a bottle of alcohol, a basin filled with warm water, and a towel. When I entered the room of the first customer, I saw that he was naked. I screamed and ran to leave the place,” said Maria.

Dili man nako gusto. Pero kinahanglan man gyud nako ug kwarta. Hantod sa nasanay nalang ko, ug nahimo kong prostitute sa usa ka tuig ra pud, kay gusto jud nako maluwas. (I didn’t want to (work like that), but I really needed the money. Over time, I got used to it, and I worked as a prostitute for about a year only, because I really wanted to leave that job).

For the self-claimed tuition fee girl who confessed in AdDU confessions, they cannot be blamed for entering in that kind of job because of the need for money. “My goal was to graduate, so I just told myself that this is for my future. I held on to the last resort that I had. You really can’t blame me for entering into that kind of job,” she said.

Ateneans’ Stance on the Issue

The issue of tuition fee girls and boys is no kept secret among Ateneans, but many try to be understanding and compassionate.

For 4th Year Mass Communication Student Jerrick Luy, there is no need for judgment, but instead, understanding, of the individuals who have this kind of job. “I think we should understand them because it’s just work and they are doing it so they can continue studying. We shouldn’t judge them because they’re only doing what they can to support themselves,” said Luy. “Who knows, really, they might not be receiving any support at all from their family,” Luy added.

When asked about what he thinks the school should do, Luy said that the school can’t do much to eradicate the trade because for him, it’s a personal decision made by the individuals. “What the school can do is respect them, welcome them, and not criticize them. Even if they are called TF girls, that’s for their future,” said Luy.

The SAMAHAN Central Board is always ready to provide assitance, said SAMAHAN External Vice President and CCO (Campus Clubs Organization) chairperson Kahlil Alcomendras. “Don’t be afraid to ask for help because something can be done, if you go through proper channels. Don’t be afraid to ask SAMAHAN to help you, the admin of the university, or even your friends,” said Alcomendras.

Approach the people whom you think will be able to help you, and you have to trust that they can. You need to be brave enough to ask for help when you need it,” she added.